Introduction

 

In-Character

"You don't want to start fights. You really don't. Finishing them, is fine. Escape from them, even better." - Onyx Diego

What's LARP anyway?

LARP stands for Live Action Roleplaying Game. Roleplaying games are those where the player makes meaningful decisions for a character. Final Fantasy or World of Warcraft are computer RPGs, where you make decisions for your character by pressing the appropriate buttons. Dungeons and Dragons is a tabletop RPG, where you make decisions by talking about what your character would do, and (usually) rolling dice. This is a Live Action RPG, where you dress up as your character and act out what they would do to the best of your ability.

There are two major types of LARP. Action LARPs, where players use padded weapons and armor and act out everything their character would do. (These tend to be epic fantasy games full of elves and wizards.) And Drama LARPs, where players act out most of what their characters would do, but use abstract methods to handle combat or other conflicts. (These tend to be set in the modern day. Usually horror.)

This game is a Drama LARP. Players pretend to be vampires, but can't really fly, or drink blood or turn into a bat. So we narrate that which we can't actually do, and use a system of rules based around drawing playing cards to arbitrate that which can't be acted out. We don't actually hit people with latex swords or shoot them with nerf guns. We talk about violence, and narrate rather than demonstrate.


 

What can I do?

Players are encouraged to dress up as their character. Use appropriate costuming and make-up to create a distinctive look which helps people see what your character looks like. While vampires do try and blend in with human society, discouraging actively anachronistic clothing, striking and interesting outfits are encouraged as they make for entertaining gameplay.

Players will walk, talk and act like their character would. The expectation is that players will remain "in-character" as much as possible, and not stop the flow of a conversation to crack jokes about out-of-game concerns.